Tagged in: indian

Khayber Indian Restaurant – 373-375 Antrim Road, Glengormley BT36 5EB

After a long time, must be over 5 years, since we last went to the Khayber we have now been twice in the past month. The décor is still similar with rather traditional red drapes, which give it a old fashioned feel, and dim lighting.  The service is efficient if not effusive and one is left to pour ones own wine from the start.

Having said this the food leaves nothing to be desired. I chose the Lamb Tikka Garlic Chilli Masala and was  offered a choice of the lamb cooked tender or from the tandoor which leaves it, whilst not tough,much more “solid”. I prefer the tandoori version and was not disappointed.  It is classed as hot and lives up to this with plenty of onion and chilli and a really tasty sauce.  Josephine, who prefers the milder spiced dishes, took the Chicken Dopiaza which comes with cubed onions and green peppers. Our usual sides are Aloo Gobi and Tarka Dall, lentils in spiced sauce, or Chana Bhagee, the chick pea version.  One boiled rice and a nan bread completed the meal.

We washed it down with the house red, which at £12.95 takes a lot of beating.

A really enjoyable meal with pleasant service and, at under £50 including wine, a brandy and a coffee, pretty hard to beat.

London Town

Trafalgar Square by night

How to spend a weekend break in London. As usual Julie-Anne of Oasis Travel organised everything in her inimitable manner including a “surprise” hotel which turned out to be the Cavendish in Jermyn Street and you don’t get much more central than that.

We went directly from Gatwick to the BETT  exhibition in Olympia. This grandstands educational technology which is an important aspect of  my business.  It is amazing to see what is available to the modern teacher and the enthusiasm with which many of them enter into the spirit of it.

Anyway, having completed my imperatives and had a general swan abound the stands we headed off to the hotel to prepare for an evening out with my old (by way of length of time) friends Les and Dot Jones.

The hotel is excellent, positioned directly opposite the rear entrance to Fortnum & Mason, and the service could not be faulted, with one exception which I will mention later.

The Chandos

We decided to walk down to St. Martin in the Fields where we had arranged to meet up in the Chandos Bar a well known hostelry which does a nice line in John Smiths for £2.00 a pint.  This is amazing if you are used to Belfast bar prices!

Great place for a chat and a bit of craic with other clientèle.

Jacksons & Joneses at Veeraswamy's

A couple of pints later we headed off to  Regent Street and the Veeraswamy Indian restaurant, the oldest in the UK having been in the same location since 1926.

For a more detailed account of our visit try this link.

From here we wandered up towards Picadilly for  a nightcap before parting from our friends.

Of course we stopped in the Cavendish lobby bar for a couple before retiring.  Their prices are what one would expect in a hotel anywhere, but, to give them their due, the spirit measures were better than the usual English offering!.

Breakfast the next morning was somewhat of a revelation and our one issue with the service.  One leaves ones name with the maître d’ and sits and reads the paper, Daily Telegraph is free to all, until there is a table free.  This can take up to half an hour.  I had a chat with the said maître and he told me that the only way to miss the “rush” was to be down before 8.30 (or after 11.00 – they serve until noon) or use room service. The choice is excellent and the quality unbeatable, however, they ran out of scrambled egg and it took nearly 15 minutes before a refill arrived.  Of course all eggs are free range they were worth the wait.

From breakfast we headed out to Forntum’s for a quick look round their sale. Suckered into buying an apple cake and Christmas sweets (will be in date for next year) and a jar of cognac cream (which was confiscated at Gatwick).

From there we walked up Picadilly to Liberty’s, my favourite London shop, beats Harrods into a cocked hat. I acquired three new Liberty Print bow ties at a saving of £120 from the retail, happy days indeed. Unfortunately the shirts I liked only came in slim fit and, as  those of you who know me will vouchsafe, that is not a fitting to which I could aspire.

Real Ale list at the Clachan

All this shopping gave us a bit of a thirst so we walked round the corner into Kingly Street and were confronted by the Clachan Bar a Victorian Pub with a huge array of real ale and a very appetizing Great British Lunch menu which, but for our late breakfast, we may well have partaken.

Refreshed we wandered on and Josephine found a nice pair of boots in Canvas and I invested the money I had saved in Liberty’s plus a heap more in a pair of Russell and Bromleys casuals.

Caffé Concerto

We found ourselves back in the Nash Arch and outside the Caffé Concerto.  One cannot pass this patisserie; it has a magnetic force. So that was a millefeuille and juice for Josephine and the soup of the day and a Pinot Grigio for me.

We retired to the hotel and had wash and brush up and a couple of hours rest before heading off once again.  This time for dinner at the Café des Amis in Hanover Square which is the subject of a separate post.

From here we walked the short distance to the Lyceum Theatre to see the Lion King. I am not a musical fanatic but this was spectacular, if not for the music then for the technical brilliance. There was a row of kids behind us who were up and down like Jacks-in-a-box until the curtain went up – then mesmerised into silence. In my book well worth the money.  Pretty good reviews all round.

We walked back up to the hotel and nipped into the bar where we got into conversation with some other guests so a pleasant end to a busy day.

Unfortunately the fire alarm went off at about 7am so we were all evacuated into the courtyard.  Long way down the stairs from the 9th floor. Apparently it was triggered in a room on the 10th. Finally got back in after 20 minutes waiting for the fire brigade to clear the building. Could have been worse.

Due to the usual breakfast debacle we had to leave to catch our flight without food but made up for it at the Armadillo in Gatwick.

Flight home on time concluding a very enjoyable weekend.



Veeraswamy, 99 Regent Street, London

Veeraswamy Regent Street

The oldest Indian restaurant in the UK, Veeraswamy’s has been in the same location in the Nash Arch, Regent Street, since 1926.  It has recently been refurbished and is far more open-plan than I remember from my last visit back  in the ’60s. There is still a doorman, but he no longer the enormous turbaned Sikh.

We had joined up with Les & Dot Jones for an evening out on the town and as we are all Indian food fanatics had booked a table for 4 at this famous hostlery.

Having passed coats, etc. on to the concierge, we took the lift to the first floor restaurant.  Our table had been booked months ago and even then we could only get a 7.15 time slot.

The service is smooth and unobtrusive. We ordered the “non vegetarian” platter all round for starters. This consisted of a spiced lamb kebab, a beef “burger”, and chicken accompanied by a dip.  Exceptionally tasty all round.

We picked a variety of main courses, sea-bass wrapped in banana leaves, a chicken chatpatta, paneer in a fruity sauce and for me a duck Vindaloo.  It would be hard to pick a favourite as they were all so different.  The duck vindaloo was outstanding and not, as one might have expected, fiery. The sea-bass was firm and the complimentary spice brought out the favour perfectly.  Too often fish curries are mushy and the fish is lost in the sauce. It was all accompanied by a bowl of simple rice and a basket of breads.

For wine three of us had an Italian Bardolinowhilst Dot tried their ginger cooler, which she assured us was delicious, and gingery!

It is not the cheapest place to eat in town but the quality of the food and the service certainly compensates for this. The cheapest bottle of wine is £24.00 The overall bill, including service which is automatically  added at 12.5%,  for the two courses, a bottle of wine and the cooler was a little under £220. I have paid more for a less satisfying evening.

If you are an Indian cuisine fan it is a must.

Well Fed!

Jaipur, Grafton Gate East, Milton Keynes

The Jaipur advertises itself as the largest Indian Restaurant in Europe.  I am not in a position to verify or refute this, but it certainly is an impressive edifice. It came recommended by my companion and so we took a taxi through the snow to sample it’s renowned cuisine.  The foyer gives no real impression of the remainder of the complex which has the Indian restaurant on the ground floor to the left and the “Orchid Lounge” Thai somewhere else. Our coats were duly collected and we were ushered into the spacious restaurant area.  It was sparsely occupied, maybe on account of the weather.  My concern would be that on a busy night the tables for two are placed very close together and it would probably be difficult, if not impossible, to have a tête-à-tête.  This was confirmed by another friend who personally encountered this problem.

But I digress!  Whilst we perused the menu we ordered Puppadoms, which came with the inevitable chutneys.  They provide a good selection which includes an excellent lime pickle.  My friend mixes the chopped onion with mango which makes an interesting combination.

We decided to miss the starters and go for a main course each and a couple of vegetable side dishes.  Lal Maas, a lamb and red chilli dish, Aloo Gobi, potatoes and cauliflower and  Chana Bhagee, chick peas with onions and tomatoes and spices.  The cuisine is exemplary.  Lal Maas is naturally hot but they managed to capture the full flavour of all the spices and  the lamb was cooked to perfection.  Too often it is  stringy or gristly or both.  Both the side dishes were cooked to leave the vegetables and pulse firm and had just sufficient sauces to produce a full flavour without being intrusive.

I do not think I have got this far before without mentioning the wine.  A Chilean Merlot  that proved to be strong enough not to be overpowered by the food.

We finished up with excellent coffee, freely refilled, and a couple of very acceptable Courvoisier cognacs.

Verdict.  Food perfect and service pretty good.  I am to be convinced by the ambience but not enough to stop me from going back to try out another section of the menu.